Civil Orders of Enforcement

# Civil Order of Enforcement #

I. Powers of the Civil Order of Enforcement

(a) In order to give the People the ability to contest unconstitutional laws, and says the monies of the People fund the activities of the State, let it be made into law the creation of “Civil Orders of Enforcement” (COEs).

(b) By petition, the People may enact against the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) a “Civil Order” which will force, by will of the people, that all agents of the state do one of the following things:

(1) Not enforce a given law (e.g. not enforce Red Flag laws)
(2) Not commit a certain action (e.g. not form speed traps for collection of monies from the People as a result of victimless crimes)

(c) 2/3 petitions in favor against the number of registered voters in the State of Florida will be required for a COE to be enacted into law.

II. Limitations on the Power of the Civil Order of Enforcement

(a) Let it be noted that a Civil Order of Enforcement can only limit the enforcement of given laws or actions committed by the FDLE. COEs cannot be used to enforce new rules/laws not passed by the Florida Congress and signed into law by the Governor of the State of Florida. COEs can also not be used to have the agents of the State act in such a way which would violate the rights of the People (e.g. confiscate firearms).

III. Override of the Civil Order of Protection

(a) If a Civil Order of Enforcement is deemed unconstitutional against the United States Constitution, it can be contested by the Florida Supreme Court and returned the body of the People for a secondary vote. If the body of the People achieves a 4/5 petition in favor, the Civil Order of Enforcement will supersede the decision of the Supreme Court.

IV. Local Enactment of a Civil Order of Protection

(a) If a county, municipality, or the like, would like to enact their own COE, it will only require a 1/3 petition in favor, counted against the number of registered voters in that district. If the local courts find the COE to be unconstitutional, a 2/3 petition will override the order of the local court. Further intervention by the courts can be appealed up to the Florida Supreme Court for resolution.

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